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sustainable palm oil conversation and debate

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We need to talk about peat

Peat

Emissions from peatlands are likely to be the single largest source of GHG emissions related to regional palm expansion in Southeast Asia through 2050. With unwavering demand for palm oil, what is at stake? And how do we reconcile oil palm cultivation with peat preservation?

Post date: 15th August 2014

Introducing the debaters

Lael Goodman
Union of Concerned Scientists
Kevin Brown
Winrock International
Chris Malins
ICCT
Marcel Silvius
Wetlands International
"Southeast Asia is rich in peat soils but they are increasingly threatened by the expansion of oil palm plantations"
"Future palm expansion must be diverted onto non-peat and low-biomass landscapes such as already degraded forests"
"Often the emissions from peat decomposition make biodiesel worse for the climate than the fossil fuel it replaces"
"Degraded peatlands can be rehabilitated and managed as a main part of sustainable and integrated landscape management"

Lael Goodman
Union of Concerned Scientists

"Southeast Asia is rich in peat soils but they are increasingly threatened by the expansion of oil palm plantations"
Read article

Kevin Brown
Winrock International

"Future palm expansion must be diverted onto non-peat and low-biomass landscapes such as already degraded forests"
Read article

Chris Malins
ICCT

"Often the emissions from peat decomposition make biodiesel worse for the climate than the fossil fuel it replaces"
Read article

Marcel Silvius
Wetlands International

"Degraded peatlands can be rehabilitated and managed as a main part of sustainable and integrated landscape management"
Read article

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